Friday, November 02, 2007

Crow's Nest

There is some interesting news here today, at Sex Crimes blog. One is about a sex offender running for the school board. Another is about the unintended but actually rather forseeable effect of California's residency restrictions, which have caused more and more to become homeless and fall off the radar, which makes it harder to keep track of them which defeats the purpose of the law. Go figure.

http://sexcrimes.typepad.com/sex_crimes/2007/11/around-the-web.html

UPDATE: from Texas
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/110407dnmetsexordinance.2cee065.html

HT: Sex Crimes blog

A Public Defender blog has some good news on the sex offender front from Connecticut. Lawmakers want to streamline the sex offender registry in order to provide more relevant information on those who have the highest risk of re-offending.

The Associated Press is reporting that a federal grand jury is investigating magician David Copperfield because of allegations that he raped and threatened a Washington woman at his Bahamanian estate. TalkLeft also followup has the story.

A new sex offender program run by the Missouri Department of Mental Health has impressive results with treating sex offenders.



And regarding Henry, sorry Habeas, here are a few recent cases from the Circuits:

Reed v. Quarterman, No. 05-70046 (5th. Cir. 10/9/2007) (5th. Cir., 2007) COA
Bower v. Quarterman, No. 03-40980 (5th. Cir. 8/16/2007) (5th. Cir., 2007) IA
Bell v. Miller, No. 05-5235-pr (2nd Cir. 8/31/2007) (2nd Cir., 2007)
Coble v. Quarterman, No. 01-50010 (5th. Cir. 8/14/2007) (5th. Cir., 2007) DP

So, death is different. If/when we move on from dp cases, will it then become more difficult to obtain relief? Technically the standards for relief are identical regardless of the nature of the crime or punishment but, dp cases are litigated to the hilt by law to the chagrin of many, are thus very expensive for society (taxes up?) and soak up resources that should/could be used to litigate other questions. This means that for criminal defendants and petitioners not given the dp it is that much harder (and slower) to have their case heard.

And here is a link to a case in which the philosophical aspects of legal technicalities turns theory into practice, Danforth. As we all wait with abated breath for the opinion...breathe, breathe, if you're not breathing it's not yoga folks.

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